Government on the Web http://www.governmentontheweb.org/?q=tag/Digital%20Era%20Governance en Interactive Map of Central Government Online http://www.governmentontheweb.org/?q=blog/2012/10/interactive-map-central-government-online <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-blog-tags"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Big Data </div> <div class="field-item even"> Citizen-Government Interactions </div> <div class="field-item odd"> Digital Era Governance </div> </div> </div> <div class="all-attached-images"><div class="image-attach-body image-attach-node-78" style="width: 100px;"><a href="/?q=content/ukgov2-620png"><img src="http://www.governmentontheweb.org/sites/governmentontheweb.org/files/images/ukgov2-620.thumbnail.png" alt="ukgov2-620.png" title="ukgov2-620.png" class="image image-thumbnail " width="100" height="64" /></a></div> </div><p>We have collected and visualized a pilot crawl of UK Central Government websites in late 2011, showing all hyperlinks between central departments and the size of departmental web sites. This work was funded by the <a href="/projects/70">ESRC Internet, Public Policy and Political Science project</a> and the JISC-funded <a href="http://blogs.oii.ox.ac.uk/vis/">InteractiveVis project</a>. The UK government digital landscape is set for some major changes with the replacement of the direct.gov portal with the new gov.uk portal --- it will be interesting to see the difference in network configuration when we carry out the crawl again later this year.</p> <!--break--><!--break--><p>Please click the image below for an <a href="http://oxfordinternetinstitute.github.com/InteractiveVis/network/?config=config_ukgov.json">interactive HTML5 exploration of the crawl data</a>. (Please note, this requires an up-to-date browser: Firefox, Chrome, Opera, IE9+.)</p> <p><a href="http://oxfordinternetinstitute.github.com/InteractiveVis/network/?config=config_ukgov.json"><img src="/sites/governmentontheweb.org/files/images/ukgov2-620.png" /></a></p> <style> .all-attached-images {display: none;} </style> http://www.governmentontheweb.org/?q=blog/2012/10/interactive-map-central-government-online#comments Big Data Citizen-Government Interactions Digital Era Governance frontpage ippps Tue, 23 Oct 2012 08:15:20 +0000 Scott A. Hale 79 at http://www.governmentontheweb.org Big Data: Demonstrating the Value of the UK Web Domain Dataset for Social Science Research http://www.governmentontheweb.org/?q=projects/74 <div class="field field-type-date field-field-project-date"> <div class="field-label">Project Date:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-start">Feb 2012</span><span class="date-display-separator"> - </span><span class="date-display-end">Aug 2013</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-project-cat"> <div class="field-label">Categories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Digital Era Governance </div> <div class="field-item even"> Citizen-Government Interactions </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-number-integer field-field-pub-experiment"> <div class="field-label">Experiment?:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> No </div> </div> </div> <p>The Oxford Internet Institute Government on the Web team is excited to announce a new big data project: <em><a href="http://www.oii.ox.ac.uk/research/projects/?id=88">Big Data: Demonstrating the Value of the UK Web Domain Dataset for Social Science Research</a></em>.</p> <p>The potential of web archives for link analysis research has been well documented, but this potential has yet to be realised and demonstrated in good research. This project aims to increase visibility, accessibility, and ease-of-use of the JISC UK Web Domain Dataset, a 30 terabyte web archive of the .uk country-code top level domain (ccTLD) collected from 1996 to 2010. The project will extract link graphs from the data, assess the feasibility and impact of using the .uk ccTLD as a boundary for UK web presence, and conduct and disseminate high-quality social science research examples using the collection. It will also trial tools and procedures to make the data more easily accessible including tools for remote access and assessing the feasibility of developing code to allow the easy import of link data from the collection into NodeXL or other network data analysis software packages to allow for easy access, visualisation, and analysis of subsets of the corpus.</p> <p>The current and transient nature of the Web means that new information replaces older information constantly without any record of the previous state (or versions) of the same information. While new information is being added, existing information also disappears from the Web, leaving a significant gap in our knowledge of the historical web and potentially in social history and our understanding of change over time. The JISC UK Web Domain Dataset, maintained by the British Library who are partnering with us in this project, contains webpages within the .uk ccTLD from 1996 to 2010. We are excited to explore this dataset from a Big Data prospective and to enhance the collection to allow for easier future use.</p> <p><a href="http://www.oii.ox.ac.uk/research/projects/?id=88">Further details of this project</a> is available on the Oxford Internet Institute's website.</p> http://www.governmentontheweb.org/?q=projects/74#comments bigdata Citizen-Government Interactions Digital Era Governance frontpage Tue, 07 Feb 2012 14:56:50 +0000 Scott A. Hale 74 at http://www.governmentontheweb.org Government and IT report released http://www.governmentontheweb.org/?q=blog/2012/01/government-and-it-report-released <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-blog-tags"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Digital Era Governance </div> </div> </div> <p>The Government on the Web team is pleased to announce the publication of <em>Government and IT&#151;"a recipe for rip-offs": Time for a new approach: Further Report</em> by the House of Commons Public Administration Select Committee. The report incorporates the Government's response to the Committee's Twelfth Report of 2010-12 of the same name and includes comments from Professor Helen Margetts, Oxford Internet Institute, and Professor Patrick Dunleavy and Jane Tinkler, LSE Public Policy Group.</p> <!--break--><!--break--><p>The new report with the Government's response is available in PDF format at:<br /> <a href="http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201012/cmselect/cmpubadm/1724/1724.pdf">http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201012/cmselect/cmpubadm/1724/1724.pdf</a>. A HTML version and further information about the report can be found on <a href="http://www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees-a-z/commons-select/public-administration-select-committee/news/it-further-report-press-release/">the Select Committee's webpage</a>.</p> <p>The Committee's original report, <em>Government and IT&#151;"a recipe for rip-offs": time for a new approach, Twelfth Report of Session 2010-12</em>, published on 28 July 2011 can be found here:<br/><a href="http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201012/cmselect/cmpubadm/715/71502.htm">http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201012/cmselect/cmpubadm/715/71502.htm</a></br/></p> <p>The press-release for the report follows:<br /> <strong>Pasc Insists Government IT Strategy has Still To Address Challenges Of "Intelligent" Procurement</strong></p> <p>Government IT procurement strategy is still lacking in its commitment to independent benchmarking of contracts with transparent data, failing to understand the risks of legacy systems, remains unclear about how to address the IT skills gap with sufficiently senior and experienced people, and must move faster to implement ‘digital by default' to design better IT services.  Government must build "in house" contracting capacity if it is to achieve its intended cost reductions and address the significant challenges facing it in large procurement projects.  </p> <p>In a follow up report on the Government's response to the Committee's report into IT procurement in Government, released today Thursday 26th February, 2012, PASC commends the Government for its generally constructive and proactive response, but points out key areas where the Government's intended course of action will not be sufficient to address "the scale of behavioural and process change required across government" to achieve its own aims of becoming an "intelligent" customer.  </p> <p>The government has also failed to respond at all to the Committee's call for an investigation into the charge that the large systems integrators operate in the manner of a cartel. </p> <p>The Committee's report concluded that a lack of up-to-date and accurate information about government IT made it impossible for the Government to identify potential overcharging, leading to the waste of an "obscene amount of public money". It recommended an independent investigation into allegations of cartel-like behaviour among suppliers, and that the Government work with "independent and specialist advisers and the NAO" to "seek to identify reliable and comparable cost benchmarks, and collect accurate information from departments in order to compare with those benchmarks." The Committee now says the Cabinet Office's commitment (in the response) to benchmarking through transparent data will help, but without also taking the independent external advice recommended by the Committee the overall outcome will not change, and the Government will not achieve its cost reduction agenda.</p> <p>The Committee is also not convinced by the Government‘s approach to "legacy systems" – how the transition from existing to new IT systems is handled -  properly addresses the underlying issues.  At the very least, the Government should produce a long term risk-register identifying where and when investment will be needed to migrate and replace existing legacy systems. </p> <p>The Committee welcomes and endorses the Government's acknowledgement of the need to grow its capacity in commercial skills of procuring and managing contracts,  not just technical IT skills, in order to become an 'intelligent customer'. However, the Committee remains concerned that the Government's plans may not be adequate to cope with the scale of behavioural and process change required across the whole of Government, nor that the new Civil Service champions of ‘agile development' will have sufficient seniority, expertise or support. </p> <p>The Committee says there are obvious areas in which the Government could go further and move faster to implement 'digital by default'.  For example, officials should be rewarded for using social media and digital channels to disseminate information and provide services (especially where this reduces reliance on other, more expensive channels). User feedback submitted via the Directgov site provides the Government with a great deal of free data on the strengths and weaknesses of its service provision.  The Government must make good use of it, alongside other information from social media produced outside Directgov itself, to understand better how its services are used and perceived and, in turn, to design better services.</p> <p>Bernard Jenkin MP, Chair of the Committee said:<br /> "This was a generally constructive response which we welcome, but it does not suggest that the government yet grasps how much must be done.  The problems in IT procurement go deep and require major changes.  This can only be achieved by bringing in IT executives and buyers from large and small companies, who understand what they are buying and the innovations on offer.  This expertise cannot be contracted out.  It is a people challenge.  The few new people brought in so far are having to battle against the failed culture of the establishment.  We also renew our recommendation of an independent investigation into allegations of cartel-like behaviour among the major systems integrators, which itself may prove structural rather than deliberate.  We may have to return to this issue in a future inquiry."</p> http://www.governmentontheweb.org/?q=blog/2012/01/government-and-it-report-released#comments Digital Era Governance frontpage Thu, 26 Jan 2012 16:57:44 +0000 Scott A. Hale 73 at http://www.governmentontheweb.org The Internet, Public Policy and Political Science: Collective Action, Governance and Citizen-Government Interactions in the Digital Era http://www.governmentontheweb.org/?q=projects/70 <div class="field field-type-date field-field-project-date"> <div class="field-label">Project Date:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-start">Apr 2011</span><span class="date-display-separator"> - </span><span class="date-display-end">Apr 2014</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-project-cat"> <div class="field-label">Categories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Digital Era Governance </div> <div class="field-item even"> Citizen-Government Interactions </div> <div class="field-item odd"> Collective Action </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-number-integer field-field-pub-experiment"> <div class="field-label">Experiment?:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Yes </div> </div> </div> <p>We are currently engaged in a three-year research programme on The Internet, Public Policy and Political Science: Collective Action, Governance and Citizen-Government Interactions in the Digital Era, which started 1st April 2011.</p> <p>More information about this project is available in the <a href="http://www.oii.ox.ac.uk/news/?id=516"><strong>OII press release</strong></a>, and <a href="http://www.oii.ox.ac.uk/research/projects/?id=71"><strong>project description page</strong></a>.</p> <p>This research programme aims to assess where political science understanding, knowledge and theory should be re-examined and developed in light of widespread use of the Internet, and to develop methodologies to study online behaviour.</p> <h2>Outputs (ongoing)</h2> <ul> <li><a href="/publications/82">Petition Growth and Success Rates on the UK No. 10 Downing Street Website</a></li> <li><a href="/publications/83">Modeling the Rise in Internet-based Petitions</a></li> <li><a href="/publications/84">Leadership without Leaders? Starters and Followers in Collective Action on the Internet</a> </li><li> </li><li><a href="/publications/69">Draft: Applying Social Influence to Collective Action: Heterogeneous Personality Effects</a></li> <li><a href="/publications/68">Social Information and Political Participation on the Internet: an Experiment</a></li> </ul> http://www.governmentontheweb.org/?q=projects/70#comments Citizen-Government Interactions Collective Action Digital Era Governance Wed, 28 Sep 2011 08:52:16 +0000 Scott A. Hale 70 at http://www.governmentontheweb.org New research project: The Internet, Public Policy and Political Science http://www.governmentontheweb.org/?q=blog/2011/04/new-research-project-internet-public-policy-and-political-science <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-blog-tags"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Digital Era Governance </div> <div class="field-item even"> Collective Action </div> <div class="field-item odd"> Citizen-Government Interactions </div> </div> </div> <p>We will begin a new three-year research programme on <em>The Internet, Public Policy and Political Science: Collective Action, Governance and Citizen-Government Interactions in the Digital Era</em> starting 1st April.</p> <p>More information about this project is available in the <a href="http://www.oii.ox.ac.uk/news/?id=516"><strong>OII press release</strong></a>, and <a href="http://www.oii.ox.ac.uk/research/projects/?id=71"><strong>project description page</strong></a>.</p> <!--break--><!--break--><p>This research programme aims to assess where political science understanding, knowledge and theory should be re-examined and developed in light of widespread use of the Internet, and to develop methodologies to study online behaviour.</p> http://www.governmentontheweb.org/?q=blog/2011/04/new-research-project-internet-public-policy-and-political-science#comments Citizen-Government Interactions Collective Action Digital Era Governance frontpage ippps Fri, 01 Apr 2011 17:14:48 +0000 Scott A. Hale 67 at http://www.governmentontheweb.org Understanding Governments and Citizens On-line: Learning from E-commerce http://www.governmentontheweb.org/?q=publications/39 <div class="field field-type-text field-field-publication-type"> <div class="field-label">Type:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Paper </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-number-integer field-field-pub-experiment"> <div class="field-label">Experiment?:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Yes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication-cat"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Digital Era Governance </div> <div class="field-item even"> Citizen-Government Interactions </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-publication-date"> <div class="field-label">Date:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">Sep 2007</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-publication-citation"> <div class="field-label">Citation:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Margetts, H. &amp; Escher, T., (2007) Understanding governments and citizens on-line: learning from e-commerce. <em>Annual Meeting of the <a href="http://www.apsanet.org/section_222.cfm">American Political Science Association (APSA)</a></em>. Chicago, USA 30 Aug - 2 Sept.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!--break--><!--break--><p>by Helen Margetts (Oxford) and Tobias Escher (Oxford).</p> <p>This paper has been presented at the Annual Meeting of the <a href="http://www.apsanet.org/section_222.cfm">American Political Science Association (APSA)</a> in Chicago (30 August - 2 September 2007).</p> <p>Economists studying commercial activity on-line argue that the most significant difference between on-line and off-line commerce is the ability of firms to ‘know who your customers are and treat them differently’ (Vulkan 2006), customizing prices and offerings. This difference comes from the huge amount of data generated by on-line transactions, in terms of historical records, usage statistics and real-time data. Yet in political life, governmental organizations and political parties have been far slower to use such data to improve their service offerings and devise innovative policy interventions, such as differential pricing and personalized information provision. Likewise, political scientists lag behind economists in terms of analyzing new on-line relationships between citizens and political organizations, for example through the use of experiments and modelling of transaction data. This paper investigates ways in which political scientists might also further understanding of on-line political behaviour, using analysis of webmetric data and the results of laboratory experiments where subjects are incentivized to simulate social choices on-line. The findings might be used by governmental organizations to feed into service improvements and policy innovation processes.</p> <table id="attachments" class="sticky-enabled"> <thead><tr><th>Attachment</th><th>Size</th> </tr></thead> <tbody> <tr class="odd"><td><a href="http://www.governmentontheweb.org/sites/governmentontheweb.org/files/Escher and Margetts APSA 2007.pdf">Understanding Governments and Citizens On-line</a></td><td>119.18 KB</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> http://www.governmentontheweb.org/?q=publications/39#comments Citizen-Government Interactions Digital Era Governance Tue, 18 Sep 2007 14:30:20 +0000 Scott A. Hale 39 at http://www.governmentontheweb.org Government on the Internet: Progress in delivering information and services online http://www.governmentontheweb.org/?q=publications/26 <div class="field field-type-text field-field-publication-type"> <div class="field-label">Type:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Report </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-number-integer field-field-pub-experiment"> <div class="field-label">Experiment?:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Yes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication-cat"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Digital Era Governance </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-publication-date"> <div class="field-label">Date:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">Aug 2007</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-publication-citation"> <div class="field-label">Citation:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Dunleavy, P., Margetts, H., Bartholomeou, P., Bastow, S., Escher, T., Pearce, O., Tinkler, J., Broughton, H., Davies, M., &amp; Crowley, T. (2007) <em>Government on the Internet: Progress in delivering information and services online</em>. National Audit Office Report by the Comptroller and Auditor General, HC 529 Session 2006-2007, 13 July.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="all-attached-images"><div class="image-attach-body image-attach-node-13" style="width: 128px;"><a href="/?q=content/logo-national-audit-office"><img src="http://www.governmentontheweb.org/sites/governmentontheweb.org/files/images/nao_logo.gif" alt="logo-National Audit Office" title="logo-National Audit Office" class="image image-medium " width="128" height="51" /></a></div> </div><p>A new report on the state of UK government on the internet has been published by the UK National Audit Office on 13 July 2007, based on research by a team from the Oxford Internet Institute<br /> (University of Oxford) and the LSE Public Policy Group (London School of Economics and Political Science).</p> <p>The report to Parliament 'Government on the internet: progress in delivering information services online' looked at the progress made by government in delivering services and information online since the NAO last reported in 2002. Government organisations spend some £208 million on websites each year. Usage of the main government websites has risen over time and some sites are widely and repeatedly used. For example 78 per cent of Jobcentre Plus online service users visited its sites at least once a week. However, the study reports a number of areas where departments and agencies could improve value for money in the provision of online information and services.</p> <p>The researchers found that: <ul> <li>Government web sites tend to be text heavy and complex to understand and to navigate</li> <li>Many agencies have little information about how much online provision of services costs</li> <li>Most departments lack sufficient information about who is using their sites and how they are being used</li> </ul> </p><p>The team was led by <a href="http://www.lse.ac.uk/people/p.dunleavy@lse.ac.uk/" target="_blank">Professor Patrick Dunleavy</a> of LSE and <a href="http://www.oii.ox.ac.uk/people/faculty.cfm?id=2" target="_blank">Professor Helen Margetts</a> of the University of Oxford.</p> <p><a href="http://www.oii.ox.ac.uk/people/faculty.cfm?id=2"><img src="/sites/governmentontheweb.org/files/helen_margetts_small.jpg" alt="Professor Helen Margetts" vspace="5" width="130" align="right" border="0" height="87" hspace="8" /></a><br /> Professor Margetts said: <i>"There is great potential for government organizations to use the internet imaginatively, for example to identify what people want to do on line. That way, services can be designed around the citizen and citizens can interact with government using the type of applications they use in everyday life."</i></p> <p>For the <a href="./downloads/report_2007/Government_On_The_Internet_Press-Release.pdf">NAO press release, click here</a>.</p> <p>Press enquiries: Donna Watson NAO Press Office: Tel: +44 (0)20 7798 7038</p> <p>To download a copy of the report, <a href="#download">see below</a>. Hard copies can be obtained from The Stationery Office on +44 (0)845 702 3474.</p> <h2>Related Reports</h2> <ul> <li>February 2009: The final report of the Power of Information Taskforce by the Cabinet Office calls for implementing the NAO report Government on the Internet. <a href="http://poit.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/poit/2009/02/implement-the-national-audit-office-report-final/"> See the recommendations in detail</a></li> <li>April 2008: As part of Ofcom's Second Public Service Broadcasting Review, MTM London used data from <i>Government on the Internet</i> to estimate the expenditure of UK institutions and organisations on public service content online. <a href="downloads%5Creport_2007/Ofcom_Annex_9_Estimating_the_value_of_public_sector_content_online.pdf">Download a copy of this report</a></li> <li>March 2008: For the report of the Public Accounts Committee which is based on this study, see the <a href="http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200708/cmselect/cmpubacc/143/143.pdf">UK Parliament website</a>.</li> </ul> <h2>Contact</h2> <p><a href="http://www.oii.ox.ac.uk/people/faculty.cfm?id=2" target="_blank">Professor Helen Margetts</a>, Oxford Internet Institute on +44 (0)1865 287210 or <a href="mailto:h.margetts[A%20T]ox.ac.uk">email</a>.</p> <p>Our research methods were:</p> <ul> <li> A survey of central government organisations to collect information about the cost and usage of their online services;</li> <li> A census of central government websites to evaluate how informative and interactive they are;</li> <li> Analysis of web links across the government domain to find out how ‘connected’ government websites are;</li> <li> Experiments to explore users’ experience of government websites;</li> <li> Focus groups and polls with citizens on how they use government services online;</li> <li> Identification of good practice; and </li> <li> Comparison with governments from other countries, local government and the private sector.</li> </ul> <p>The study team for this report was <a href="http://www.lse.ac.uk/people/p.dunleavy@lse.ac.uk/" target="_blank">Professor Patrick Dunleavy</a> (LSE), <a href="http://www.oii.ox.ac.uk/people/faculty.cfm?id=2" target="_blank">Professor Helen Margetts</a> (Oxford), <a href="http://www.lse.ac.uk/collections/LSEPublicPolicy/whosWho.htm" target="_blank">Jane Tinkler</a> (LSE), <a href="http://www.lse.ac.uk/collections/LSEPublicPolicy/whosWho.htm" target="_blank">Simon Bastow</a> (LSE), <a href="http://www.lse.ac.uk/collections/LSEPublicPolicy/whosWho.htm" target="_blank">Oliver Pearce</a> (LSE) and <a href="http://people.oii.ox.ac.uk/escher/" target="_blank">Tobias Escher</a> (Oxford).</p> <p><a name="download"></a>To view the contents of the Government on the Internet report, please use the links below:</p> <table id="attachments" class="sticky-enabled"> <thead><tr><th>Attachment</th><th>Size</th> </tr></thead> <tbody> <tr class="odd"><td><a href="http://www.governmentontheweb.org/sites/governmentontheweb.org/files/Government_On_The_Internet_Summary.pdf">Summary</a></td><td>214.58 KB</td> </tr> <tr class="even"><td><a href="http://www.governmentontheweb.org/sites/governmentontheweb.org/files/Government_On_The_Internet_Full-Report.pdf">Full Report</a></td><td>875.8 KB</td> </tr> <tr class="odd"><td><a href="http://www.governmentontheweb.org/sites/governmentontheweb.org/files/Government_On_The_Internet_Part-One.pdf">I: Quality of Online Provision</a></td><td>374.63 KB</td> </tr> <tr class="even"><td><a href="http://www.governmentontheweb.org/sites/governmentontheweb.org/files/Government_On_The_Internet_Part-Two.pdf">II: Quality of Online Provision</a></td><td>182.93 KB</td> </tr> <tr class="odd"><td><a href="http://www.governmentontheweb.org/sites/governmentontheweb.org/files/Government_On_The_Internet_Part-Three.pdf">III: Future Developments</a></td><td>204.67 KB</td> </tr> <tr class="even"><td><a href="http://www.governmentontheweb.org/sites/governmentontheweb.org/files/Government_On_The_Internet_Appendices.pdf">Appendices</a></td><td>156.5 KB</td> </tr> <tr class="odd"><td><a href="http://www.governmentontheweb.org/sites/governmentontheweb.org/files/Government_On_The_Internet_Research-Report.pdf">Full Research Report</a></td><td>655.67 KB</td> </tr> <tr class="even"><td><a href="http://www.governmentontheweb.org/sites/governmentontheweb.org/files/Government_On_The_Internet_Research-A.pdf">A: Supplementary Information</a></td><td>417.7 KB</td> </tr> <tr class="odd"><td><a href="http://www.governmentontheweb.org/sites/governmentontheweb.org/files/Government_On_The_Internet_Research-B.pdf">B: List of Organisations</a></td><td>10.32 KB</td> </tr> <tr class="even"><td><a href="http://www.governmentontheweb.org/sites/governmentontheweb.org/files/Government_On_The_Internet_Research-C.pdf">C: Web Crawling Report</a></td><td>96.5 KB</td> </tr> <tr class="odd"><td><a href="http://www.governmentontheweb.org/sites/governmentontheweb.org/files/Government_On_The_Internet_Research-D.pdf">D: User Experiments Report</a></td><td>98.47 KB</td> </tr> <tr class="even"><td><a href="http://www.governmentontheweb.org/sites/governmentontheweb.org/files/Government_On_The_Internet_Research-E.pdf">E: Focus Groups Report</a></td><td>51.93 KB</td> </tr> <tr class="odd"><td><a href="http://www.governmentontheweb.org/sites/governmentontheweb.org/files/Government_On_The_Internet_Research-F.pdf">F: National Survey Report</a></td><td>35.14 KB</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> http://www.governmentontheweb.org/?q=publications/26#comments Digital Era Governance Mon, 13 Aug 2007 15:50:49 +0000 Scott A. Hale 26 at http://www.governmentontheweb.org Breaking Barriers to eGovernment http://www.governmentontheweb.org/?q=projects/21 <div class="field field-type-date field-field-project-date"> <div class="field-label">Project Date:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-start">Jan 2005</span><span class="date-display-separator"> - </span><span class="date-display-end">Jan 2008</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-project-cat"> <div class="field-label">Categories:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Digital Era Governance </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-number-integer field-field-pub-experiment"> <div class="field-label">Experiment?:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> No </div> </div> </div> <div class="all-attached-images"><div class="image-attach-body image-attach-node-20" style="width: 108px;"><a href="/?q=content/logo-european-commission"><img src="http://www.governmentontheweb.org/sites/governmentontheweb.org/files/images/logo-european_commission.gif" alt="logo-european commission" title="logo-european commission" class="image image-medium " width="108" height="60" /></a></div> </div><p>Overcoming obstacles to improving European Public Services is a three year project funded by the European Commission and led by the Oxford Internet Institute, Oxford University. The research is identifying and exploring the barriers to eGovernment services and their legal foundations; and will propose legal and organizational solutions to overcome such obstacles.</p> <!--break--><!--break--><h2>Project Website for More Information</h2> <p><a href="http://www.egovbarriers.org">http://www.egovbarriers.org</a></p> <h2>Funding</h2> <p>This project has been funded by the European Commission.</p> http://www.governmentontheweb.org/?q=projects/21#comments Digital Era Governance Mon, 13 Aug 2007 09:48:10 +0000 Scott A. Hale 21 at http://www.governmentontheweb.org Governing from the Centre? Comparing the Nodality of Digital Governments http://www.governmentontheweb.org/?q=publications/38 <div class="field field-type-text field-field-publication-type"> <div class="field-label">Type:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Paper </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-number-integer field-field-pub-experiment"> <div class="field-label">Experiment?:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Yes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication-cat"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Citizen-Government Interactions </div> <div class="field-item even"> Digital Era Governance </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-publication-date"> <div class="field-label">Date:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">Sep 2006</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-publication-citation"> <div class="field-label">Citation:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Escher, T., Margetts, H., Petricek, V., &amp; Cox, I. (2006) Governing from the Centre? Comparing the Nodality of Digital Governments. <em>2006 Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association</em>, Philadelphia, 31 Aug - 4 Sept.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>by Tobias Escher (UCL School of Public Policy), Helen Margetts (UCL and Oxford Internet Institute),<br /> Ingemar J. Cox (UCL Computer Science) and Vaclav Petricek (UCL Computer Science)</p> <p>This paper has been presented at the Annual Meeting of the <a href="http://www.apsanet.org/mtgs/program/">American Political Science Association (APSA)</a> in Philadelphia (31. August - 4. September 2006).</p> <p>What difference does e-government make to the capacity of governments to interact with citizens? How does it affect government’s place in social and informational networks - the ‘nodality’ of contemporary government? What is the structure of ‘government on the web’ and how do citizens experience government on-line?<br /> This paper uses methods from computer science (particularly webmetrics) and political science (a ‘tools of government’ approach) to go further than previous work in developing a methodology to quantitatively analyse the structure of government on the web, building on Petricek et al (2006). It applies structural metrics (via webcrawling) and user metrics (via user experiments) to the web sites of comparable ministries concerned with foreign affairs in three countries (Australia, the US and the UK).<br /> The results are used to assess the on-line presence of the three foreign offices along five dimensions: visibility, accessibility, extroversion, navigability and competitiveness. These dimensions might be developed further as indicators for use by both researchers (to assess e-government initiatives) and by governments (to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of their on-line presence). Governments which are successful in developing their web sites in this way are likely to have greater visibility to citizens, businesses and other governments, strengthening nodality as a policy tool. </p> <p>This publication is part of the <a href="/projects/19">Participation in Internet-mediated Interactions project</a>.</p> <table id="attachments" class="sticky-enabled"> <thead><tr><th>Attachment</th><th>Size</th> </tr></thead> <tbody> <tr class="odd"><td><a href="http://www.governmentontheweb.org/sites/governmentontheweb.org/files/Margetts_et_al_APSA_2006_0.pdf">Governing from the Centre? Comparing the Nodality of Digital Governments</a></td><td>376.77 KB</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> http://www.governmentontheweb.org/?q=publications/38#comments Citizen-Government Interactions Digital Era Governance Mon, 18 Sep 2006 14:28:14 +0000 Scott A. Hale 38 at http://www.governmentontheweb.org Digital Era Governance: IT Corporations, the State, and e-Government http://www.governmentontheweb.org/?q=publications/22 <div class="field field-type-text field-field-publication-type"> <div class="field-label">Type:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Book </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-number-integer field-field-pub-experiment"> <div class="field-label">Experiment?:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> No </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication-cat"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Digital Era Governance </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-publication-date"> <div class="field-label">Date:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">Nov 2006</span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-publication-citation"> <div class="field-label">Citation:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Dunleavy, P., Margetts, H., Bastow, S., and Tinkler, J. (2006). <em>Digital Era Governance: IT Corporations, the State, and e-Government</em>. Oxford: Oxford University Press.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="all-attached-images"><div class="image-attach-body image-attach-node-61" style="width: 166px;"><a href="/?q=content/book-digitial-era-governance"><img src="http://www.governmentontheweb.org/sites/governmentontheweb.org/files/images/digital_era_governance.medium.jpg" alt="Book: Digitial Era Governance" title="Book: Digitial Era Governance" class="image image-medium " width="166" height="250" /></a></div> </div><p>A book by <a href="http://www.lse.ac.uk/people/p.dunleavy@lse.ac.uk/" target="_blank">Professor Patrick Dunleavy</a>(LSE), <a href="http://www.oii.ox.ac.uk/people/faculty.cfm?id=2" target="_blank">Professor Helen Margetts</a> (Oxford), <a href="http://www.lse.ac.uk/collections/LSEPublicPolicy/whosWho.htm" target="_blank">Jane Tinkler</a> (LSE) and <a href="http://www.lse.ac.uk/collections/LSEPublicPolicy/whosWho.htm" target="_blank">Simon Bastow</a> (LSE).</p> <!--break--><!--break--><p>Published by Oxford University Press on 2nd November 2006 (<a href="http://www.oup.com/uk/catalogue/?ci=9780199296194" target="_blank">order details</a>).<br /> June 2008: This book is now also available as paperback (<a href="http://www.oup.com/uk/catalogue/?ci=9780199547005" target="_blank">order details</a>).</p> <p> <strong>Description</strong></p> <ul> <li> A timely exploration of the rapidly changing and increasingly controversial world of e-government</li> <li> Government information systems typically account for around 1.5 per cent of GDP, and are critical to all aspects of public policy and governmental operations</li> <li> Examines e-government in seven countries: The US, the UK, Japan, Australia, Canada, the Netherlands, and New Zealand</li> <li> Examines the impact of computer service providers as major players in government on three policy sectors: social welfare, tax, and immigration control</li> </ul> <p> Government information systems are big business (costing over 1 per cent of GDP a year). They are critical to all aspects of public policy and governmental operations. Governments spend billions on them - for instance, the UK alone commits £14 billion a year to public sector IT operations.</p> <p> Yet governments do not generally develop or run their own systems, instead relying on private sector computer services providers to run large, long-run contracts to provide IT. Some of the biggest companies in the world (IBM, EDS, Lockheed Martin, etc) have made this a core market. The book shows how governments in some countries (the USA, Canada and Netherlands) have maintained much more effective policies than others (in the UK, Japan and Australia). It shows how public managers need to retain and develop their own IT expertise and to carefully maintain well-contested markets if they are to deliver value for money in their dealings with the very powerful global IT industry.</p> <p> This book describes how a critical aspect of the modern state is managed, or in some cases mismanaged. It will be vital reading for public managers, IT professionals, and business executives alike, as well as for students of modern government, business, and information studies.</p> http://www.governmentontheweb.org/?q=publications/22#comments Digital Era Governance Wed, 13 Sep 2006 09:56:36 +0000 Scott A. Hale 22 at http://www.governmentontheweb.org